Situation of people with mental disabilities in Ghana

To read on Human Rights Watch:

Ghana: People With Mental Disabilities Face Serious Abuse

People with mental disabilities suffer severe abuses in psychiatric institutions and spiritual healing centers in Ghana, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The Ghanaian government has done little to combat such abuse or to ensure that these people can live in the community, as is their right under international law.

The 84-page report, “‘Like a Death Sentence’: Abuses against Persons with Mental Disabilities in Ghana,”describes how thousands of people with mental disabilities are forced to live in these institutions, often against their will and with little possibility of challenging their confinement. In psychiatric hospitals, people with mental disabilities face overcrowding and unsanitary conditions. In some of the spiritual healing centers, popularly known as prayer camps, they are often chained to trees, frequently in the baking sun, and forced to fast for weeks as part of a “healing process,” while being denied access to medications.

The report also highlights the challenges of people with mental disabilities who live in the community, who face stigma and discrimination and often lack adequate shelter, food, and healthcare.

“The government needs to take immediate steps to end abuses against people with mental disabilities in institutions, prayer camps, and the community,” said Medi Ssengooba, Finberg fellow at Human Rights Watch. “The conditions in which many people with mental disabilities live in Ghana are inhuman and degrading.”

The report is based on more than 170 interviews with people with mental disabilities in the country’s three public psychiatric hospitals, and in eight prayer camps and the community; family members; healthcare providers; administrators and staff of prayer camps; government officials; and staff members of both local and international organizations working in Ghana.

The World Health Organization estimates that close to 3 million Ghanaians live with mental disabilities and 600,000 of these have very severe mental conditions.

Ghana’s three public psychiatric hospitals – in Accra, Pantang, and Ankaful – house an estimated 1,000 people with mental disabilities. In all three institutions, Human Rights Watch found filthy conditions, with foul odors in some wards or even feces on the floors due to broken sewage systems. The hospital in Accra was severely overcrowded and many people spent all day outside the hospital building in the hot sun, with little or no shade.

Human Rights Watch found that at least hundreds – and possibly thousands – of people with mental disabilities are institutionalized in prayer camps associated with Pentecostal churches. Managed by self-proclaimed prophets, these camps operate completely outside of government control. People with mental disabilities at these camps do not receive any medical treatment – in some, such treatment is prohibited even when prescribed by a medical doctor. Instead, the prophets seek to “cure” residents through miracles, consultation with “angels,” and spiritual healing.

The report found even worse conditions in prayer camps than in psychiatric institutions. At the eight prayer camps inspected, nearly all residents were chained by their ankles to trees in open compounds, where they slept, urinated, and defecated and bathed. Some had been at the prayer camps for as long as five months. As part of the “healing process,” people with mental disabilities in these camps – including children under age 10 – are routinely forced to fast for weeks, usually starting with 36 hours of so-called dry-fasting, denied even water.

Doris Appiah lived both in prayer camps and psychiatric hospitals for a total of over 10 years, but is now living in the community. While in prayer camps, Appiah was tied with ropes for over two months, and forced to take harmful local herbs, which caused side effects to her tongue.

“As soon as you get a mental disability, you nearly lose all your rights, even to give your opinion,” she told Human Rights Watch. “We call on government to ensure that services are available to persons with mental disabilities as close as possible and that prayer camps are monitored to guard against abuse of those admitted.”

Ghana ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in July 2012. Under this convention, countries must undertake steps to ensure that people with mental disabilities can make important life decisions for themselves, including choosing their place of residence and with whom they live, and that they are not forced to live in institutions.

Ghana’s 2012 Mental Health Act, which went into effect in June, creates a system through which people with disabilities can challenge their detention in psychiatric hospitals. However, the law does not apply to prayer camps, leaving residents without legal remedies to seek release. In most prayer camps, residents may only leave when the prophet deems them healed.

The act also allows forced admission and treatment in psychiatric hospitals and promotes guardianship as opposed to supported decision-making, which limits people with mental disabilities from making their own decisions. Both are inconsistent with the Disability Rights Convention.

The government should create community-based support services, including housing and healthcare that enable people with mental disabilities to live in the community, Human Rights Watch said. Facilities where people with mental disabilities are admitted or treated, including prayer camps, should be carefully regulated. The government should also ensure that people are not forcefully detained in these facilities or in psychiatric hospitals and that they have access to mechanisms to challenge any violations of their rights.

“Ghana deserves credit for ratifying the Disability Rights Convention,” Ssengooba said. “Now it’s time for some real changes to both policy and practice for people with mental disabilities in Ghana.”

La situation des personnes ayant une DI au Ghana (Human Rights Watch)

L’organisation Human Rights Watch a publié un rapport (disponible en anglais) sur les conditions de vie des personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental, au Ghana. Il peut être utile de savoir que le terme handicap mental peut regrouper des personnes ayant une déficience intellectuelle et des personnes ayant des problèmes de santé mentale.

Ghana: Les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental sont exposées à de graves abus

Le gouvernement doit agir pour améliorer la situation difficile des personnes souffrant d’un handicap mental

Les résidents du Centre de renouveau spirituel et de guérison Heavenly Ministries, dans le sud du Ghana, atteints d’un handicap mental, sont confinés dans des espaces restreints qu’ils ne sont autorisés à quitter qu’avec l’autorisation du personnel de ce « camp de prière » ; certains sont enchaînés au mur. © 2011 Shantha Rau Barriga/Human Rights Watch
« Le gouvernement ghanéen doit sans plus tarder prendre des mesures pour mettre un terme aux abus dont font l’objet les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental dans les institutions, les camps de prière et au sein de la communauté. Les conditions dans lesquelles nombre d’entre elles vivent au Ghana sont inhumaines et dégradantes.» Medi Ssengooba, chercheur et titulaire d’une bourse Finberg chez Human Rights Watch

(Accra, le 2 octobre 2012) – Les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental sont victimes de graves abus dans les établissements psychiatriques et les centres de guérison spirituelle du Ghana, a déclaré Human Rights Watch dans un rapport publié aujourd’hui. Le gouvernement ghanéen ne déploie guère d’efforts pour lutter contre ce type d’abus ou s’assurer que ces personnes puissent vivre au sein de la communauté, comme elles sont habilitées à le faire en vertu du droit international.

Le rapport de 84 pages, intitulé « ‘Like a Death Sentence’: Abuses against Persons with Mental Disabilities in Ghana » (« ‘Comme une peine de mort’ : Abus contre les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental au Ghana »), révèle que des milliers d’individus atteints d’un handicap mental sont contraints de vivre dans ces établissements, souvent contre leur gré, et souvent privés de toute possibilité de contester leur enfermement. Dans les hôpitaux psychiatriques, les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental se retrouvent confrontées à une surpopulation et des conditions insalubres. Dans certains centres de guérison spirituelle, connus sous le nom de « camps de prière », elles sont souvent enchaînées à des arbres, sous un soleil torride, et contraintes à jeûner pendant des semaines dans le cadre d’un « processus de guérison », se voyant refuser tout accès à un traitement médicamenteux.

Le rapport met également en évidence les difficultés que rencontrent les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental vivant au sein de la communauté, qui sont victimes d’une stigmatisation et d’une discrimination et ne bénéficient souvent pas d’un hébergement, de nourriture et de soins de santé adéquats.

« Le gouvernement ghanéen doit sans plus tarder prendre des mesures pour mettre un terme aux abus dont font l’objet les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental dans les institutions, les camps de prière et au sein de la communauté », a déclaré Medi Ssengooba, chercheur et titulaire d’une bourse Finberg chez Human Rights Watch. « Les conditions dans lesquelles nombre d’entre elles vivent au Ghana sont inhumaines et dégradantes. »

Le rapport s’appuie sur plus de 170 entretiens menés auprès de personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental dans les trois hôpitaux psychiatriques publics du pays ainsi que dans huit camps de prière et au sein de la communauté ; des familles de ces personnes ; de prestataires de soins de santé ; d’administrateurs et de membres de personnel de camps de prière ; d’agents du gouvernement; et de membres du personnel d’organisations locales et internationales œuvrant au Ghana.

L’Organisation mondiale de la Santé estime que près de 3 millions de Ghanéens vivent avec un handicap mental, 600 000 d’entre eux étant atteints de troubles mentaux très graves.

Les trois hôpitaux psychiatriques publics du Ghana – à Accra, Pantang et Ankaful – accueillent, d’après les estimations, un millier de personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental. Dans ces trois établissements, Human Rights Watch a découvert des conditions sordides, une odeur nauséabonde se dégageant de certains services et les sols étant même par endroits jonchés d’excréments en raison de systèmes d’égout défaillants. L’hôpital d’Accra était gravement surpeuplé et de nombreuses personnes passaient leurs journées à l’extérieur du bâtiment, avec peu, voire aucune possibilité de se mettre à l’abri d’un soleil ardent.

Human Rights Watch a découvert que des centaines, voire des milliers de personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental sont institutionnalisées dans des camps de prière associés aux églises pentecôtistes. Gérés par des prophètes autoproclamés, ces camps opèrent en dehors de tout contrôle gouvernemental. Les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental n’y reçoivent aucun traitement médical – dans certains, celui-ci est en effet interdit même lorsqu’il est prescrit par un docteur en médecine. Les prophètes préfèrent ainsi recourir aux miracles, aux consultations avec des « anges » et à la guérison spirituelle pour tenter de « soigner » les résidents.

Le rapport a découvert que les conditions dans les camps de prière sont encore pires que dans les établissements psychiatriques. En effet, dans les huit camps de prière inspectés, la quasi-totalité des résidents étaient enchaînés à des arbres par les chevilles dans des cours ouvertes où ils devaient dormir, faire leurs besoins et faire leur toilette. Certains s’y trouvaient depuis déjà cinq mois. Dans le cadre du « processus de guérison », les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental résidant dans ces camps – y compris les enfants de moins de 10 ans – sont fréquemment forcées de jeûner pendant plusieurs semaines, pratique qui commence généralement par un jeûne dit « à sec » de 36 heures pendant lequel elles n’ont même pas le droit de boire de l’eau.

Doris Appiah a passé plus de dix ans en camps de prière et en hôpitaux psychiatriques, mais elle vit aujourd’hui au sein de la communauté. Lors de ses séjours en camps, Appiah s’est retrouvée attachée par une corde pendant plus de deux mois et contrainte à ingurgiter des herbes locales nocives qui lui ont abîmé la langue.

« Du moment où l’on a un handicap mental, on perd pratiquement tous ses droits, même le droit de donner son avis », a-t-elle déclaré à Human Rights Watch. « Nous demandons au gouvernement de s’assurer que les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental puissent accéder à des services le plus près possible de leur domicile et que les camps de prière soient surveillés afin d’éviter que les personnes qui y séjournent ne soient victimes d’abus. »

Le Ghana a ratifié la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées en juillet 2012. En vertu de celle-ci, les pays doivent instaurer des mesures pour s’assurer que les personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental puissent prendre d’elles-mêmes des décisions importantes concernant leur vie, notamment choisir où habiter et avec qui, et qu’elles ne soient pas forcées à vivre en institution.

La loi ghanéenne sur la santé mentale (Mental Health Act) de 2012, entrée en vigueur au mois de juin, instaure un système permettant aux personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental de contester leur internement dans un hôpital psychiatrique. Cependant, la loi ne s’appliquant pas aux camps de prière, les personnes qui y résident n’ont aucun recours juridique pour obtenir leur libération. Les résidents ne peuvent quitter la plupart des camps de prière que lorsque le prophète estime qu’ils sont guéris.

Cette loi permet également l’internement et le traitement forcés dans un hôpital psychiatrique et encourage la mise sous tutelle au lieu d’une prise de décisions accompagnée, limitant ainsi la capacité des personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental à prendre leurs propres décisions. Ces deux aspects portent atteinte à la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées.

Le gouvernement devrait créer des services d’aide communautaires, notamment dans les domaines du logement et des soins de santé, pour permettre aux personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental de vivre au sein de la communauté, a affirmé Human Rights Watch. Les structures d’accueil ou de traitement des personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental, y compris les camps de prière, devraient être soigneusement réglementées. Le gouvernement devrait également s’assurer que ces personnes ne soient pas retenues de force dans ce type de structures ou dans des hôpitaux psychiatriques et qu’elles aient accès à des mécanismes leur permettant de former un recours en cas de violation de leurs droits.

« Le Ghana mérite que l’on reconnaisse sa décision de ratifier la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées », a précisé Medi Ssengooba. « Il est temps maintenant de modifier de manière tangible tant la politique que la pratique relatives aux personnes atteintes d’un handicap mental au Ghana. »

 

Photo Human Rights Watch